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Day 05 - jaisalmer

Jaisalmer Fort 

jaisalmer-fortThe name Jaisalmer evokes a vivid picture of sheer magic and brilliance of the desert. The exotic, remote and beautiful Jaisalmer is a bit of a paradox. So far West that it is in the heart of the desert, one would expect barren near-desolation. Yet this frontier town is today one of Rajasthan's best-loved tourist destinations.
The golden - hued Jaisalmer Fort 'Sonar Kila' can be seen miles away before reaching the town. Standing proud to a height of hundred metres over the city with its 99 bastions, the fort is a splendid sight in the afternoon Sun. In fact the fort is a part of the desert citadel, walking up and down the cobbled and narrow lanes, one gets the feeling of a different age altogether.

Nathmal ji ki Haveli

nathmalji-Ki-HaveliTwo architect brothers built it in the 19th century. Interestingly, while one concentrated on the right, the other concentrated on the left and the result is a symphony epitomising the side by side symmetry during construction. 
Paintings in miniature style monopolise the walls in the interior. Mighty tuskers carved out of yellow sandstone stand guard to the haveli.

Patwon-Ki-Haveli

patwan-haveliThis is one of the largest and most elaborate havelis in Jaisalmer and stands in a narrow lane. It is five storey high and is extensively carved. It is divided into six apartments, two owned by archaeological Survey of India, two by families who operate craft-shops and two private homes. There are remnants of paintings on some of the inside walls as well as some mirrorwork. 

Salim Singh ki Haveli

salim_singh-ki-haveli This haveli was built about 300 years ago and a part of it is still occupied. Salim Singh was the prime minister when Jaisalmer was the capital of the princely state and his mansion has a beautifully arched roof with superb carved brackets in the form of Peacocks. The mansion is just below the hill and it is said that once it had two additional wooden storeys in an attempt to make it as high as the maharaja's palace, but the maharaja had the upper storey torn down.